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Field Trips

Thursday, July 8

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), Sketching in the Teaching Marsh
8:00a.m. to 11:30a.m. Limit 15.

The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) is among the largest marine research and education centers in the United States. Research at the center extends from inland watersheds to open ocean with primary emphasis on coastal and estuarine science. Your visit to VIMS will begin with an introduction to the facility, followed by a morning spent drawing in the teaching marsh where labels assist in the identification of the wide variety of grasses, shrubs, trees, and flowers adapted to both fresh and salt water wetlands. Visits by a variety of birds and butterflies are frequent, and juvenile crabs, snails, clams, and many insects may be seen. Enjoy a dip in the York River, if desired, before breaking for a delicious box lunch.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), Sketching in the Live Zooplankton Lab,
1:30pm to 5:30p.m. Limit 15.

After lunch, the VIMS staff will seine a net of zooplankton for you to take
indoors, and with the help of a VIMS research scientist, identify your
specimen before settling down to draw your tiny creature.

Taskinas Creek Canoe Trip
1/2 day trip 8:00a.m. to 12:00p.m. Limit 14

Taskinas Creek Canoe Trip A Park naturalist will lead you as you paddle your own 3-person canoes through this salt water tidal creek and surrounding watershed for a lesson in salt marsh ecology. This is a rare and delicate environment where fresh water and salt water meet to create a habitat rich in marine and plant life. Photo opportunities. This strenuous trip requires 2 hours of
paddling canoes through a beautiful, hot, sunny, humid environment. Insect repellant is a must.

Jamestowne Rediscovery Project
1/2 day trip 12:30p.m. to 4:30p.m. Limit 30

The Jamestowne Rediscovery Project. Visit this active archaeological project investigating the remains of 1607 - 1698 Jamestowne, the first permanent English colony in America. Here, on May 13, 1607, 107 Englishmen, women, and children arrived in the New World on three small boats. The next day they stepped ashore, never to leave. Take a guided tour of the current excavation site and visit the conservation lab. After the 1 1/2 hour tour, go to Historic Jamestowne (www.historicjamestowne.org), a reconstruction of the original settlement and Pohatan indian village based on eye-witness drawings by John White. Explore full scale replicas of the three 1607 ships and get a sense of the strenuous living conditions endured by the 17th century voyagers. Sketch, take photos, or simply enjoy Historic Jamestowne, where you can handle reproduction tools, drill with the militia, and immerse yourself in Early American life.

Friday, 9 July

Great Dismal Swamp
All day trip 7:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. Limit 14.

The Great Dismal Swamp. Accompany Dr. Rob Atkinson, wetland ecologist, swamp researcher, and Dismal Swamp enthusiast to this 111,000acre undeveloped wildlife refuge on the Virginia-North Carolina border. The Great Dismal Swamp comprises one of the largest continuous forests on the East coast. Walk through a white cedar forest and watch as cedar, gum, and maple trees give way to the wetter woodlands dominated by the bald cypress. The swamp is rich in flora and fauna. A large variety of warblers live here; butterfly diversity is well documented; and an unusually large number of frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes, and lizards inhabit the swamp area. White-tailed deer are common, as are the rarely seen black bear and bobcat. Trace the footsteps of slaves escaping the slave states via this portion of the underground railway while imagining the lives of those rumored to have made the swamp their home for years. See the 3100 acre Lake Drummond. Sketching and photo opportunities. This is considered a very strenuous trip because of the heat, extreme humidity, insect life, and terrain in the swamp.

Jefferson Lab
1/2 day trip 8:00 to 11:30 Limit 15

Jefferson Lab. The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, is a nuclear physics research lab operated by SURA, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, for DOE. An international community of about 2,000 scientists conducts research to expand the understanding of the structure of matter and the forces that hold the atom's nucleus together. Superconducting electron accelerating technology makes Jefferson Lab unique. The electron beam reaches energies up to almost 6 billion electron volts (6 GeV) before it is split for simultaneous use in three experimental halls. This tour will take you deep into the underground chambers housing subatomic particle detection machines six stories tall.

Virginia Living Museum
1/2 day trip 8:00 to 11:30am Limit 15

Return to the Virginia Living Museum, site of the art exhibit, for a morning spent observing the live animal habitats. Walk the 1/2 mile boardwalk over Deer Park lake and winding through the woods to see bald eagles, bobcats, deer, turkeys, skunks, opossum, and red wolves - the most endangered animals in America. Wander at your leisure through the aviary with 16 species of birds found in Virginia, and the huge 35,000 gallon aquarium of Virginia cove sea life.

Boat Tour of Hampton Roads Harbor
1/2 day trip 12:45 to 6:30 Limit 15 (possibly 30)

Boat Tour of Hampton Roads Harbor. Depart the Hampton waterfront on board the tour boat, The Miss Hampton II, for a 3 hour voyage, and pass the point where the head of Blackbeard the Pirate was displayed. Enter Hampton Roads Harbor, where the confluence of four rivers and the Chesapeake Bay forms the worlds largest natural harbor. Weather permitting, stop for a 45 minute tour of historic Fort Wool, a Civil War island fortress. Travel across this busy, working harbor for a close-up view of the massive warships at Norfolk Naval Base, the worlds largest shipyard and home to nuclear powered aircraft carriers, submarines, Aegis destroyers, and more. The return trip features a narrative of the historic battle of the Ironclads. Snacks and beverages available at the on-board snack bar.

Saturday, July 10

Lighthouses and Ecology of The Outer Banks of North Carolina
All day trip 7:00a.m. - 11:30p.m. or later limit 55 passengers, class limit 14.

Join naturalist Dr. Harold Cones, for a trip to view, explore, and sketch the Lighthouses and Ecology of The Outer Banks of North Carolina. The Outer Banks of North Carolina are barrier islands. The passage of salt water over these islands during severe weather selectively removes vegetation, giving rise to a characteristic barrier island ecosystem composed chiefly of salt tolerant plants. Human encroachment and development are rapidly destroying these fragile ecosystems. On this trip you will visit Corolla and the Currituck Beach Light, a slender brick lighthouse and associated keeper compound next to the sound, and the historic Whalehead Club. Then you will drive down to Bowdie Island Light, to explore a nature trail leading to a wildlife pond that is often covered with a variety of birds. Next, you'll visit the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge, where loggerhead turtle nesting sites are protected and a nursery for the safe hatching of young turtles is maintained. Dinner will be at a picturesque oceanfront restaurant. Although this description seems otherwise, this will be a leisurely trip with plenty of time for sketching or photography. Dr. Cones has a wealth of information that he is eager to share. A wonderful opportunity to learn about and see the treasure that is The Outer Banks. The bus will carry those who wish to be part of the field sketching group and those who prefer to sight see only. Groups will split up at the various stops. The bus will return to W&M.
Dorm checkout is 10am Sat. morning, so overnight hotel reservations need to be made. Luggage should be carried with you to the bus. W&M is allowing rental cars to remain parked on campus until bus returns. (We are looking into block hotel reservations in Williamsburg).

Map of the Outer Banks (this is a fairly large image and will take some time to download)


  Sciart.com